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Leveled Pack

Differentiated Learning Pack

Graphing - Grade 5

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Graphing - Grade 5

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Graphing is simply a way of showing information in a mathematical picture. There are many kinds of graphs, but the bar graph is the most commonly used one for elementary school students. Make sure that the graph has a title, that both axis are labeled and that it shows a numerical scale. The number in the lower left corner is always a zero.  A properly made bar graph will not have the bars touching; there should be a space between each bar.Please see below for a selection of Leveled Lessons for Below Level (basic), On Level (median), and Above Level (competent) readers.
Pack Contents

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Magic Show
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Doctor Knows Best
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A Riddle to Dive Into
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Teaching Tips

Introduce your students to graphing by giving each child one of the small packages of M&M® candies that we usually buy at Halloween. Have them PREDICT the number of candies in their bag. Then open, count and sort the candies by color. Put up a large sheet of graph paper to use as a model and provide students with individual sheets of graph paper.

 

While you model, help students draw and label a horizontal and vertical axis and put in the zero. Have students label the horizontal axis: Colors of M&Ms®, and write in the names of the colors in the bags. On the vertical axis they should write: Numbers of M&Ms®. and write in numerals 1-12. Continue to model as you color in the appropriate number of squares to show how many candies of each color you had in your bag. Each child will do this for the numbers of candy in their bag, so every child’s paper will be the same, but they will all contain different data.

 

When you are finished, talk about what you can tell by looking at the graph: The orange and green candies had the same amounts. There were more red candies than any other color.